City of Vancouver rezoning applications snapshot, 1-Nov-2017

As a free public service we take a monthly snapshot of the City of Vancouver’s Rezoning Applications listed on the City of Vancouver website.

A  tech-savvy citizen is voluntarily producing two  handy online maps (click bottom right to switch between rezoning and development applications). They are typically right up to date:
https://vancouverapps-fa328.firebaseapp.com/rezapps.html

Below is the snapshot of the rezoning applications as of November 1, 2017. Listed here are 73 “proposed” rezonings; 64 “approved”; 38 “enacted”; 6 “open houses”; 6 items “referred to public hearing”; 1 “withdrawn”; and 5 “updated.”

The open houses and public hearings deserve special attention as they are important chances for the public to obtain information and give feedback.

If you see any of the rezoning applications that deserve public scrutiny, please feel free to send us an e-mail (citizenYVR@gmail.com) with your concerns and we’ll see if we can look into it further. Or let the media know of your concern.

This list below is simply copied from the City’s Rezoning Centre website. There is no guarantee that the City’s links will continue working over time, so you are advised to download anything important. For the current official list, click: http://former.vancouver.ca/rezapps/. Note that the Archives link carries links to past rezonings from 2011 onward.

Download this list we saved in PDF format:
Cov Rezoning applications snapshot 1-Nov-2017

Continue reading

City of Vancouver development applications snapshot, 1-Nov-2017

A tech-savvy citizen is voluntarily producing two handy online maps (click bottom right to switch between rezoning and development applications): https://vancouverapps-fa328.firebaseapp.com/

As a free public service CityHallWatch takes a monthly snapshot of the Development Applications listed on the City of Vancouver website.

Our count for 1-Nov-2017 shows 34 “DE” applications and 95 “DP” applications (excluding 5 MMRU – Medical Marijuana-Related Use Development Applications). That 95 is way down from 178 in October. Of the DE & DP numbers, 16 are “concurrent with rezoning.” The “Centerm Port Expansion Project” is still listed without a number. Four applications are “revised,” one is “on hold,” and 0 are “unscheduled from the Development Permit Board.” Some may have also had a change of address.

Anyone interested in these projects is also encouraged to periodically check the Urban Design Panel (UDP) and Development Permit Board (DPB) schedules, as many projects appear before them as part of the approval pipeline. Check often, as sometimes their agendas appear publicly online as little as one hour before the meeting.

Upcoming UDP meetings are November 1 (for 33 storeys at 1065 Hardwood Street & 1332 Thurlow Street (West End), 32 storeys at 1066-1078 Harwood Street (West End), 10 storeys at 129 Keefer Street (Chinatown), and Heather Street Lands Workshop (4949 Heather Street, 5255 Heather Street & 657 37th Avenue) and November 15, November 29, and December 13.

Upcoming DPB dates are November 14 and 27, and December 11. Download the official DPB list (as of Nov 1, the version online is still dated 14-Sept-2017:
http://vancouver.ca/files/cov/current-development-applications-development-permit-board.pdf

Consider writing Mayor and Council asking them to make Development Applications archives available online. The City website provides a list of archived Rezoning Applications (here) going back to 2011, so why not full information on past Development Applications too?

For current (at time of viewing) full list of applications online, click: http://former.vancouver.ca/devapps/.
For our PDF version saved November 1, 2017:

For reference, we’ve reproduced the full list of development applications as of today:
CoV Development applications snapshot 1-Nov-2017

Continue reading

Statement: Community Centre Associations are hopeful on JOA after Oct 23 Park Board meeting

The Vancouver Park Board discussed the Joint Operating Agreement with Community Centre Associations at its meeting on October 23, 2017 (Monday). The next day, the following statement was issued on behalf of several CCAs.

October 24, 2017 Statement by Community Centre Associations – CCAs hopeful re Park Board decision to make changes to Joint Operating Agreement

Statement attributable to Ainslie Kwan, Past President, Killarney Community Centre Society

Statement:

On behalf of Hastings Community Association, Kerrisdale Community Centre Society and Killarney Community Centre Society, we want to thank the Park Board Commissioners for stepping up and voting to make crucial changes to the body of the Joint Operating Agreement (JOA) at Monday night’s Park Board meeting [23-Oct-2017. See agenda/video and minutes]. This signals a shift in the tone of the relationship between the CCAs and the Park Board and we are – for the first time in a long time – hopeful that we will get an agreement that works for the Park Board and the Vancouver community centres. This was an important step forward. We are still working out the details of the appendices of the JOA, and are cautiously optimistic that we will be able to move through this process without the challenges we have faced in the past regarding this document. Continue reading

CCA Statement on Joint Operating Agreement Status: Too much control by Park Board staff jeopardizes process

Three Community Centre Assocations (CCAs) – Hastings Community Association, Kerrisdale Community Centre Society, Killarney Community Centre Society — have issued a fresh statement regarding negotiations on Joint Operating Agreement (JOA). They are stating that any hope of getting a signed JOA is in serious jeopardy because Park Board Commissioners have not stepped into a leadership role and have given staff too much control over the process.

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CCA Statement on Joint Operating Agreement Status: CCAs say Park Board Commissioners are jeopardizing JOA by giving staff too much control of the process (23-Oct-2017)

Three CCAs – Hastings Community Association, Kerrisdale Community Centre Society and Killarney Community Centre Society – are stating that any hope of getting a signed JOA is in serious jeopardy. They say Commissioners have essentially abandoned the process, allowing the Park Board General Manager to set an often hostile and aggressive tone, which has created a non-collaborative, inflexible and disrespectful process. There is increasing concern, mistrust and frustration among the CCAs regarding the Park Board’s overall objectives for the process.

Continue reading

First Baptist Church to appeal $20 million land value boost at Court of Revision (Thu/Oct 19) re 57-storey luxury tower with Westbank

969 Burrard First Baptist Westbank, elevations, application 2017 revThis case could be interesting to watch due to the players and big numbers involved. First Baptist Church, Westbank, and $20 million.

The “Court of Revision” (City Council) will sit on Thursday, October 19, at 2 pm, to hear an appeal by the First Baptist Church of Vancouver under the 2017 Land Assessment Averaging By-law. No further details on the appeal or posted on the agenda as of today, but a quick search on the City website (VANMAP, for assessed values) suggests what might be involved.

1019 Nelson location, VANMAP, 17-Oct-2017

Green box at center shows location of 1019 Nelson

First Baptist Church is showing as the owner of two lots (both with address at 1019 Nelson) adjacent to the church property (969 Burrard). It appears that the BC Assessment (done by the provincial body, independent of the City of Vancouver) values show an increase in value for 1019 Nelson from 2016 to 2017.

2016 2017
Previous Year Land Value($) Current Year Land Value($) Increase
PID15749941 $1,364,000 11,412,000 $10,048,000
PID15749959 $1,364,000 11,412,000 $10,048,000
$2,728,000 22,824,000 $20,096,000

It appears First Baptist is appealing for land averaging in order to reduce the tax bill, due to a 737% jump, worth over $20 million, in the assessed property value. Ultimately, this is probably for the benefit of Westbank’s bottom line.

At a Public Hearing held on July 18 and 25, 2017, Westbank (CEO Ian Gillespie) partnered with the First Baptist Church on Burrard and Nelson and succeeded in what was a controversial application, with City Council approving rezoning for a 57-storey luxury condo and other components (eviction of renters in low-cost rental buildings, some social housing, heritage restoration of the church, etc.). Westbank is currently conducting a saturation branding/marketing campaign (#fightforbeauty). There was a lot of media coverage about this rezoning. For one interesting angle, see “Even before Public Hearing for Burrard & Nelson project (1st Baptist Church) Westbank offers VIP access and is marketing luxury condo globally” (CityHallWatch, July 25, 2017). Continue reading

Pitched battle in Dunbar Ryerson United Church (45th and Yew) rezoning? Public Hearing Oct 17 (Tue): Open minds and respectful consideration of both sides needed.

2165-2195 West 45th Ryerson Dunbar United, rezoning 17-Oct-2017(Update: After hearing from speakers for and against, the Public Hearing ended on Oct 17. City Council will debate and vote on the application during a regular council meeting two weeks later, on Oct 31.)

The rezoning at Dunbar Ryerson United Church (2165-2195 West 45th Avenue and b) 2205-2291 West 45th Avenue) is the fifth item on the agenda for the Public Hearing on Tuesday, October 17. People are encouraged to follow @vancityclerk on Twitter for live updates on the progress of the meeting on the day.

Public Hearing (Tuesday, October 17, 2017) agenda, documents, and correspondence: Click here.

This one is looking like a hot topic for two sides. On one side is “abundant housing” activists from around the city who organized to call for increased density anywhere and everywhere, often without acknowledgement of the many other drivers of housing affordability, and without regard for local community concerns. Some congregation members also appear to support the rezoning.

On the other side are community residents who have organized as Ryerson Neighbours (www.facebook.com/ryersonneighbours).

A group of the “affordable housing” (increase supply at any cost) side set up a web page for people to click online to send their support to City Council, and their letters are prominent among the correspondence sent to City Council. (These account for over 60% of letters to Council, as of Oct 13.)

We hope that in all rezonings, both sides are respectful of others’ views.

Representative of the supply side activists is a UBC professor named Tom Davidoff of the UBC Sauder School of Business, who is closely associated with Affordable Housing Vancouver. It is unfortunate that a university professor attempts to discredit community voices by belittling local concerns: In his letter to Council, he wrote “….do the NIMBY neighbours really want to take on the representatives of what some people believe to be humankind’s savior to avoid some hypothetical damage to their extremely high property values?

We hope that others will not follow his example and that they will not fall into the habit of writing off others simply as NIMBYs. Continue reading

Public Hearing Oct 17 (Tue): 2221 Main, 124 Dunlevy, 618 West 32nd, 8242 Oak, 2165 W45th (Ryerson Dunbar United Church)

A Public Hearing is scheduled to start at 6 pm on Tuesday, October 17, with five items on the agenda. Below are a few excerpts from the City website. The Public Hearing documents are here. Rezoning application documents are here.

2221 Main rezoning image 17-Oct-20172221-2223 Main Street – 9-storey mixed-use building over four levels of underground parking. Includes commercial at grade; 145 social housing rental units; floor area of 10,695 m2 (115,123 sq. ft.); floor space ratio (FSR) of 3.3; height of approximately 29.9 m (98 ft.); and 192 parking spaces. Vancouver Park Board is also pursuing the delivery of a park at approximately 1,115 m2 (12,000 sq. ft.) on the southern portion of this site. Under the Mount Pleasant Community Plan and Implementation Policy

124 Dunlevy rezoning 17-Oct-2017124 Dunlevy Ave – Rezone from Downtown Eastside Oppenheimer District (DEOD) to CD-1 (Comprehensive Development) District. An 11-storey mixed-use building, including
relocation of the Evelyne Saller Centre to the site; social housing on floors 2-11, with a total of 213 units; floor space ratio of 5.96;  building height of 33.9m (111 ft.)

618 West 32nd rezoning 17-Oct-2017618 West 32nd Avenue – A 6-storey building that includes: 15 residential units; a building height of 21.7 m (71 ft.) from grade; a floor space ratio (FSR) of 2.46; 29 vehicle parking spaces and 20 bicycle spaces. The application is being considered under the Cambie Corridor Plan.

8242 Oak rezoning 17-Oct-20178242 Oak Street8-storey, mixed-use building that includes: total of 50 market residential units; total of 295 m² (3,172 sq. ft.) of retail area at grade; total of 437 m² (4,700 sq. ft.) of office space; maximum building height of 30.0 m (99 ft.) from grade; floor space ratio (FSR) of 3.0; 104 parking spaces and 67 bicycle parking spaces; and a public plaza. Considered under the Marpole Community Plan.

2165-2195 West 45th Ryerson Dunbar United, rezoning 17-Oct-20172165-2195 West 45th Avenue and 2205-2291 West 45th Avenue; and Heritage Designation of the Ryerson Dunbar United Church – Proposal for the two sites included in the rezoning application includes East and West Sites. East Site: proposed floor space ratio (FSR) of 2.47; 8-storey market residential development (79,802 sq. ft.) with 2.5-storey townhouses along 45th Avenue and a 4-storey podium along the adjacent lane to the north; 40 units comprised of 19 three bedrooms (47.5%), 16 two bedrooms (40%) and 5 one bedrooms (12.5%). West Site: a proposed floor space ratio (FSR) of 1.73; restoration, preservation and heritage designation, and seismic upgrading of the church including improvements to the sanctuary for enhanced music performance (13,338 sq. ft.);  new 5-storey (including basement) infill building with:
a new community activity centre on levels 1-3 (19,131 sq. ft.); and 32 units of social housing on levels 1-5 (25,006 sq. ft.) comprised of 6 two bedrooms (19%), 13 one bedrooms (40.5%) and 13 studio units (40.5%).

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1. REZONING: 2221-2223 Main Street

Correspondence:

Distribution Date Support Opposed Other
October 13, 2017  PDF 1  PDF 0

 

 

2. REZONING: 124 Dunlevy Avenue (Roddan Lodge)

 

3. REZONING: 618 West 32nd Avenue

 

4. REZONING: 8242 Oak Street

Correspondence:

Distribution Date Support Opposed Other
October 13, 2017  PDF 1 PDF 0

 

 

5. REZONING: a) 2165-2195 West 45th Avenue and b) 2205-2291 West 45th Avenue; and Heritage Designation of the Ryerson Dunbar United Church

Correspondence:

Distribution Date Support Opposed Other
October 13, 2017 58  PDF 7  PDF 0