Community Conversation: Sea level rise and coastal flooding in the False Creek area

The City of Vancouver is holding a webinar on the topic of sea level rise in False Creek. This webinar will be repeated on on three separate date: Tuesday, November 17th (3pm – 4:30pm), Tuesday, November 24th (5:30pm – 7pm) and on Wednesday, November 25th (12pm – 1:30pm). The event is free but registration is required via eventbrite .

This is the City’s announcement on twitter: “Learn about the risks associated with sea level rise in False Creek and explore potential adaptation solutions at a FREE upcoming webinar! Multiple dates available to accommodate your schedule! Register here: http://ow.ly/77aj50CbLwL

The landfilled tidal flats of False Creek could be susceptible to increases in sea level. Here’s a map of the former extent of False Creek:

Source: http://former.vancouver.ca/commsvcs/planning/creek.htm

Source:https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/publications/techrpt83_Global_and_Regional_SLR_Scenarios_for_the_US_final.pdf

3 thoughts on “Community Conversation: Sea level rise and coastal flooding in the False Creek area

  1. Wasn’t False Creek dredged from being a marsh into the depth it is today? It was originally a landlocked flat. Why not dam it at Granville ‘Island’ again if youre worried about flooding?
    This is a specious activity during a pandemic to take people on a scaremongering walk?

  2. Posting the map “former extent of False Creek” by itself is misleading to readers of this blog.

    A significant portion of the area that is shown in blue has already been flood-proofed, including Rogers Arena, the Plaza of Nations, the Concord Pacific developments, the olympic village development, Science World and adjacent parks, Science World/Main Street Station, and Emily Carr University and adjacent developments.

    • Thanks, Adam! If you are aware of a good map showing flood-proofed zones, especially if showing the height of flood-proofing, we’d like to add that in. Noting that future sea level rise could be 2 meters or more by 2100, and a rapid collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet could raise sea level by 3.3 metres (11 ft).

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